How to Repair Patio Furniture

How to Repair Patio Furniture

A patio is a lovely extension in front of one's home or in a backyard, or even by the pool, where furniture can succumb to damage if not taken care of, regularly. Because it is kept outdoors and is naturally neglected, it'll need to be repaired for certain problems which we cover in this Gardenerdy article.
Gardenerdy Staff
Patio furniture is not constructed ordinarily; they're quite different in their look and feel, compared to indoor furniture, where its material although weather-proof, can still suffer from other problems. If you go for its aesthetic quotient, and not on the lines of having it tolerate weather conditions and other environmental factors, then it is bound to get damaged because of its inappropriate material. Let's take a look at the most common problems that can occur with patio furniture, the most common makes being wicker, fabric, and even metal.
Repairing Patio Furniture
Regular Cleaning
It's important not to leave a buildup of foreign elements on furniture; regularly cleaning furniture using the right cleaning agent depending on the type of material, is crucial. To let it last longer, mend small problems before they turn into big ones. If you have fabric lining cushions and the seats of your furniture, remove the encasing and follow the instructions mentioned on the fabric, when it comes to the method of cleaning. Always pick furniture that has changeable fabric, or you'll really have a problem on your hands.
Filling Cracks
Wicker furniture is hard to maintain, since the binding can turn dry and brittle, forcing the structure to fall apart. To help it retain moisture, which is the main binding ingredient, wipe wicker furniture with a damp cloth, twice a week. Use linseed oil to fill cracks, leaving it on overnight. Wipe away the excess the following day using a damp cloth. It is better to have imitation wicker furniture in a patio, since it requires less maintenance and isn't prone to falling apart easily. Caring for wicker furniture takes commitment on the part of the owner. During the nights, cover the furniture using a cloth or tarp, or keep them indoors. Don't leave them out during the winter or when it's raining, or they'll crumble in no time.
Repairing Rips
For wicker furniture, a few fibers are bound to come undone, leaving the surface rough and uncomfortable to sit on. Use fine-grit sandpaper to level the surface before applying waterproof varnish that is appropriate for the furniture. For fabric rips and tears, replace them to avoid keeping unsightly seam scars on display. You can use hem tape to repair minor tears and rips by placing one on the underside of the fabric, so that they're concealed from view. If they're really old slipcovers and cushion covers, consider having them replaced entirely. Keep them concealed under a waterproof tarp during the rains and winter.
Loose Parts
Change parts that cannot be fixed from prolonged use or weak joints that are close to crumbling under your weight. You don't want to hurt yourself or others, so have it checked out to see if the parts can be replaced or fixed. For loose nuts and bolts, get a screwdriver and tighten these before they pop out of place. Use a nailer or hammer nails into the woodwork, to hold it together if it needs additional support.
Repairing Rust
Use a scouring brush or fine-grit sandpaper to remove signs of rust, after letting white vinegar sit (leave it on for a couple of hours) on the metal to help dislodge the rust. In case of heavy rusting, opt for commercial rust removers, followed by using a rust-proof primer and a metal-toned spray paint for a good-as-new finish.